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Megatrends
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wrd-seeing-Swrd-seeing-Ewrd-seeing-Ewrd-seeing-Iwrd-seeing-Nwrd-seeing-G



YKRICT

TRICKY

ONE.




BUT

IS ANOTHER MATTER

TODAY.




  Here,   In Brief,  Are




1
Between

ARE

WIDENING

The world will add a billion new people by 2030, and 90% of that population growth will occur in Asia and Africa. We are becoming a world of aging populations in developed countries — and young populations in developing countries.

READ WHAT TO
  • Capital flowing to the “younger” population regions to support growth.
  • People flowing in the opposite direction – to economies with older populations where new labor is needed.
2

ALSO

A SYM MET RIC ALLY

We have become a world where most people live in cities, and more of us are crowding into urban centers every year. 75% of this accelerating urban growth will occur in Asia and Africa.

  • OPPORTUNITY: A massive new middle class in Asia and Africa.
  • CHALLENGE: Urgent demand for infrastructure and services adapted to sustainability constraints that are increasingly harsh.
3

Along with the 4 BRIC economies, the “” countries are catching up to the G7 in gross domestic product. Globalization will continue to be the single biggest fact of economic life, but we are now also seeing greater localization of production, processes, and customization for consumer communities.

“BRIC” Countries

  • India
  • China
  • Brazil
  • Russia

“Next 11” Countries

  • Nigeria
  • Pakistan
  • Philippines
  • Turkey
  • Vietnam
  • Bangladesh
  • Egypt
  • Indonesia
  • Iran
  • South Korea
  • Mexico

“G7” Countries

  • Japan
  • United Kingdom
  • United States
  • Canada
  • France
  • Germany
  • Italy
  • As digital and robotic production attain critical mass and labor cost gaps narrow, OFFshoring is evolving into RIGHTshoring based on factors beyond labor cost.
4

Rising demand for food, energy, water, and other resources is intensifying geopolitical tensions as well as commercial competition. Resource constraints also apply to ready cash: Large institutions, including governments, will not be able to borrow as much as in the past to sustain their growth. Sooner or later, expect massive de-leveraging in the G7 countries.

  • Environmental and societal impacts will become increasingly central to companies’ operational decisions.
  • More public/private partnerships will be necessary to get big things done in a resource-constrained operating environment.
5
SHIFTING

Purchase equations for consumers are becoming more complex: Value is not necessarily about cost. Performance is not necessarily about horsepower. Quality of life issues — health, security, the world we will leave to our children — are the new priorities. And many more consumers are deciding not to purchase at all.

  • Continued growth of organic farming
  • Increasing use of industrial technologies in the home
  • Rapid expansion of the “sharing” economy

The digitalization of work and society is only in its adolescence, and the pace of change is accelerating. Smartphones have re-democratized innovation, with major advances achieved by small teams as well as industry. Less visible technologies are transforming healthcare and changing every aspect of how we live, work, produce, and buy.

10 Technologies That Are Changing Everything

  • Smartphones and other mobile devices
  • 3-D printing
  • Cloud services
  • Sensor technology
  • Robotics
  • Genetics
  • System intelligence
  • Data analysis on terabyte and petabyte scale
  • Connected devices: The Internet of Things
  • Ultra-small machines

A “fast follower” strategy becomes ever more difficult in an environment of accelerating change and shorter cycle times. All companies will have to innovate just to keep up.

Like tectonic plates shifting under the Earth’s surface, all of these trends are affecting your operating environment. Deciding which to address first is today’s imperative. But a decade from now, the winners will be those who saw most deeply into the entire moving landscape.